Sale 319

Harbour Auction


HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS
 
 
Lot Photo Description
Lot 240

[French and Indian War], Interesting ALS by Nathaniel Perry, one page, Fort Cumberland, April 29, 1756. To his wife:
"…The Indians killed in sight of Fort Cumberland two men, one of the Regular Troops & one of the New England Troops on April 27th and the Day before they fell on the wood party at Bay Varts and killed nine and toop one…of the Regular troops…I am in a poor steat [state] of helth [health]…" Perry asks that his wife visit two named officers and have them approach the governor for a leave of absence for Perry and his two sons, "and in the first Vessall that comes down from Boston if we are not allrady [already] sent for…" It is probable (but not certain from the text) that Perry and his sons were militia officers.
In poor condition, with many breaks, holes and stains (affecting some text), repairable. Letters from Fort Cumberland of this early date are rare.
Estimate 300 - 400

Perry would die of his illness 1½ months later, on June 15.

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Lot 241

[Revolutionary War], Interesting first-person account of the Battle of Newtown [N.Y.], ALS written by Col. George Reid (1733-1815) of the 2nd N.H. Regiment to his brother-in-law, Jonathan Nesmith in Londonderry, N.H., 1½ pages with integral address leaf (no postal markings), 8 x 13, Pumpton [now Pompton], N.J., Nov. 17, 1779. In a small, very readable script Reid has penned a detailed account of the battle, which was the only major conflict of the Sullivan Expedition. He tells of Sullivan's deployment of Genl. Poor's and Genl. Clinton's Brigades, gives details of the battle and and notes the American losses, "…I had 1 Corpl. Kill'd, 1 Major, one Captn., 2 Sergeants, 6 Corpls. and 6 pivates wounded. There was [sic] about 40 wounded in the whole among which was Lt. McCalley who first had his leg amputated and afterwards lost his life… Very Good condition with small holes at fold junctions and address leaf pieced together.
Estimate 300 - 400
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Lot 242

[Whiskey Rebellion, 1794], James Ross (1762-1847), Pennsylvania attorney and politician appointed by Washington to negotiate with the leaders of the Whiskey Rebellion, ALS, 1½ pages with integral address leaf, 7¾ x 13, Pittsburgh, Apr. 18, 1795. To U.S. Attorney General William Bradford about the case of James Kerr, a participant in the rebellion, "…there is no doubt that he signed the submission paper on the 11th of September at the township meeting…it was seized and torn by a party who opposed the submission & the meeting ended in confusion. The Ringleader of this riot who tore the paper with his own hand, & is now in Washington Jail…" Ross discusses various leaders of the insurrection, their degree of "repentance", and inquires whether the President has reviewed certain petitions. Small stain, otherwise Fine.
Estimate 150 - 200
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Lot 243

1890 Postmaster Appointment, 17 x 14, March 26, 1890, appointing James O. Brookbank postmaster at Driftwood, Pa., signed by Postmaster General John Wanamaker, folded in eighths, Fine condition with most of gold-leaf missing from P.O.D. seal.
Estimate 150 - 200
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