Sale 343

Lincoln, Slavery and the Civil War


Political and Geographical Divisions and Events Leading up to the Civil War
 
 
Lot Photo Description
Lot 3014

American Colonization Society, very articulate 1845 three-page folded letter from Ohio state representative I. Spears extolling the good work being done by the Society which promoted the "return" of free African Americans to what was considered greater freedom in Africa. The Society, established in 1816, purchased land on the east coast of Africa, establishing what would become, in 1847, the country of Liberia. Spears writes "I hope…to see the day when our [the Society's] Atlantic cities and towns will be thronged, their wharves crowded, and vessels freighted with the poor unfortunate sons of Africa, returning to the land of their fathers…". Address leaf postmarked red Columbus c.d.s. and PAID with Spear's manuscript endorsement; some splitting along folds, Fine and very interesting.
Estimate $200 - 300
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Lot 3015

Liberia, "Factory Island, July 14th, 1842", dateline on lengthy 3-page letter from Dr. Wesley Johnson with interesting contents his Aunt in Cincinnati, Oh., entered the mails with blue "Philadelphia Oct 10" c.d.s. and matching "Ship" handstamp with magenta "27" rating (25¢ postage plus 2¢ ship fee), contents include "We have at length taken possession of this place, So long under the dominion of his Satanic Magesty and have commenced the Sadie's Liberia High School…affording a few the means of making life and liberty"; some edge splitting, Fine and scarce.
Estimate $500 - 750

Dr. Wesley Johnson served as a physician at Bassa Cove under the direction of the New York and Pennsylvania colonization societies. Later he became superintendent of the high school on Factory Island under the patronage of the Ladies' Liberia School Association of Philadelphia.

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Lot 3016

Anti-Slavery, J. Valentine design, State 1, bearing Great Britain 1p red on bluish tied by grid cancellation and addressed to Bath, reverse with neat "DH OC-10 1851" c.d.s. and blue Bath (10.11) arrival d.s.; Very Fine.
Estimate $1,000 - 1,500

A CHOICE EXAMPLE OF THIS VALENTINE ANTI-SLAVERY PROPAGANDA ENVELOPE.

Provenance: Grunin
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Lot 3017

"The Innocent Cause of the War", household servant illustration on Frank Mills patriotic cover bearing 3¢ dull red (26) tied by circular grid and addressed to Pittsfield, Mass., red "Boston Mass Jul 4" d.c.d.s., "Boston Flax Mills" embossing on flap; edge tear and some creasing, Fine.
Estimate $300 - 400
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Lot 3018

Abolition Societies, 1837 folded letter from Samuel Webb, chairman of the Eastern District of the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society talking of the upcoming convention, written on the second leaf of a printed appeal for donations to the Society in order to continue publishing the anti-slavery newspaper, the National Enquirer. Address leaf postmarked blue Philada. c.d.s. with red manuscript "18" rate; toning and two leaves separated and rejoined but text is very readable.
Estimate $100 - 150

The
National Enquirer was founded by Benjamin Lundy in 1835. Lundy sold it in 1839 to fellow Quaker and abolitionist, John Greenleaf Whittier.
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Lot 3019

Southern & Western Liberty Convention announcement, 1845, two-page anti-slavery circular sent by the "Friends of Constitutional Libery" who were resolved "to effect the extinction of slavery in their respective states…"; postmarked Cincinnati, March 12, 1845, Very Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300
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Lot 3020

Anti-Slavery Speech by Senator William H. Steward, 18-page stapled booklet, 5" x 9", containing full text of a speech made before Congress on February 17, 1854 in which Seward rails against the Kansas and Nebraska Statehood Bills on the grounds that both would permit slavery north of the dividing line agreed upon in the Missouri Compromise of 1820; slightly damp-stained with covers a bit loose, Fine.
Estimate $300 - 400

Seward later became Secretary of State under Lincoln and Johnson.

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Lot 3021

John Brown, Stimson & Co. patriotic design with slogan "His Last Words. - I die for the inalienable right of mankind to freedom, whatever hue the skin may be.", bearing 3¢ rose (65) tied by two strikes of target cancels and addressed to Waterville N.Y., "Van Hornesville N.Y. Dec. 24" origin c.d.s.; Very Fine and scarce patriotic design.
Estimate $500 - 750
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Lot 3022
John Brown Signed Photo, 1859, flyleaf from a personalized Bible, 4" x 6½", signed "Farewell God bless you, Your Friend, John Brown"; matted to 5½" x 8", chipped and cracked in the upper left corner and couple of small edge tears, otherwise Fine and exceedingly rare.
Estimate $7,500 - 10,000

ONE OF ONLY THREE SURVIVING EXAMPLES OF THE TEN SIGNED BY BROWN.

It is believed only two remain in private hands.

Brown was a radical abolitionist who was tried for treason against the Commonwealth of Virginia, the murder of five pro-slavery Southerners, and inciting a slave insurrection. Refusing to claim insanity as a defense, he was found guilty on all counts and sentenced to death by hanging. After his trial he ordered ten Bibles, each of which bore his photo on the flyleaf, and inscribed and signed each of them for close friends.

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Lot 3023

1859 sympathy letter to John Brown while prisoner, cover addressed to "Capt. John Brown, A Prisoner, Charlestown, Va." and bearing 3¢ dull red (26) tied by circular grid cancel and "Ann Arbor Mich. Nov 16 1859" c.d.s.; receipt docketing by Brown at left "F. Woodruff, Michigan Sympathy"; clean and Very Fine.
Estimate $1,000 - 1,500

A SCARCE SYMPATHY LETTER TO JOHN BROWN WHILE PRISONER AT CHARLESTOWN, VA.

John Brown was an ardent abolitionist who believed it was his duty to fight pro-slavery settlors in Kansas. He hoped that a dramatic act would inspire a slave revolt and led 20 men in an attack on the Union Army Arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Va. on October 16, 1859. Captured two days later and hung December 2, 1859.

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Lot 3024

"U.S. Senate Free, J.M. Mason", free frank as Senator on circa 1850 cover to Harper's Ferry, Va., "Washington D.C. Free. Feb 12" c.d.s., Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Mason was co-author of the Fugitive Slave Act and Mason-Dixon Line south of which slavery was legal. Ironically, this cover was posted on Lincoln's birthday to Harper's Ferry, Va., where John Brown's raid in 1859 brought the Civil War closer.

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Lot 3025

Kansas-Missouri War, 1856 printed folded letter from St. Joseph, Mo. to Canton, Mo. by the Buchanan [County, Missouri] Pro-Slavery Aid Society soliciting the organization and cooperation of similar societies in the other Missouri counties bordering on Kansas Territory in order to prevent the settlement of the Territory by those "…hostile to the institution of slavery and to the best interests of this state." Address leaf franked with an 1851 3¢ stamp tied by St. Joseph c.d.s., the two leaves are separated and the address leaf is repaired along folds; Fine.
Estimate $100 - 150
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Lot 3026

"Fort Scott K.T. Apr 22", balloon style c.d.s. with ms. dating and matching "Paid" handstamp on buff cover to Governor G.W. Denver at Lecompton, K.T., George A. Crawford Attorney and Kansas Land Agency corner card, original 1858 enclosure and ALS, Very Fine and important slavery ralated content.
Estimate $1,000 - 1,500

George A. Crawford was President of the Fort Scott Town Company. He and his free-state proponents were in conflict with George W. Clarke, the Registrar of the Land Office, and his pro-slavery group. This April 7, 1858 letter to Governor Denver, asks for a free-state replacement, confrontations between the free-state and pro-slavery elements…"we have had several assassinations. You have heard of the wounding of Zumalt, a proslavery man, by a gang from the north. This was followed about ten days ago by the killing of Denton & Hedrik. Denton's son raised a gang of marauders…two more was killed".

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Lot 3027

"H. Clay", free frank as Senator, on 1837 folded cover to Washington, D.C. with "Lexington Ky. Apr 10" c.d.s. and manuscript "f" free rating, docketed "acknowledges the rect. of hemp seed"; file fold, clean and Very Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300

Henry Clay was author of the Missouri Compromise of 1820 which admitted Missouri as a slave state and Maine as a free state and limited slavery in new western states to south of Missouri's southern border.

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Lot 3028

Charles Sumner, free frank "C. Sumner" as U.S. Senator on buff cover to Scotia, N.Y., Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Charles Sumner was a prominent statesman and orator who vigorously opposed slavery. As a U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, he took an active role in the congressional debates on the Kansas/Nebraska Act. He delivered the famous two-day speech on "The Crime Against Kansas" in 1856. A town in Kansas was named in his honor.

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Lot 3029

"Free, Ch J. Faulkner, M.C.", free frank endorsement as member of congress, on cover with "Martinsburg Va. Sep 19" and matching "Free" handstamp, addressed to Summit Point, Va.; some wrinkling and wear, Fine.
Estimate $100 - 150

Charles J. Faulkner was co-author of the Fugitive Slave Act and Compromise of 1850. The act gave continued life to the Missouri Compromise by returning runaway slaves to their Southern masters.

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Lot 3030

"Daniel Webster H.R.", free frank as Representative on circa 1817 folded cover to Washington D.C., red "Boston Ms. May 2" c.d.s. and manuscript "f" free rating; couple edge tears, Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300

Daniel Webster was a strong proponent of keeping the Union and opponent of extending slavery. He was the main author of the Compromise of 1850.

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Lot 3031

Speech by Senator Alexander H. Stephens, 18-page stapled booklet, 5" x 9", containing full text of a speech made before congress on July 17, 1856 in which Stephens protests the law giving the President, through the governor of Kansas Territory, the power to disarm both the pro- and anti-slavery militias as a violation of the Second Amendment, while ignoring the fact that both sides were in open warfare against the settlers and the government; missing back cover, Fine.
Estimate $500 - 750

Stephens later became Vice President of the Confederacy.

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Lot 3032

"Free J C Calhoun", free frank endorsement as Member of Congress, on 1837 folded letter with 1.5 page ALS, addressed to Washington City, red "Charleston S.c. Mar 19" c.d.s. and matching "Free" handstamp; some aging, Fine.
Estimate $300 - 400

The March 17 letter from Calhoun thanks a friend for approving his strong state's rights pro-slavery stance.

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Lot 3033

1856 Fremont Campaign (Milgram JF-36), Fremont three-quarter portrait in oval campaign design, John Andrew imprint, on cover bearing 3¢ dull red (11A), rich color, tied by rimless "Indianapolis Ind. Sep 7" c.d.s. and addressed to Salem, N.H.; mended opening tear, Fine and attractive.
Estimate $200 - 300

John Fremont was the first Presidential Candidate of the Whig Party (later Republican) in the 1856 Election.

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Lot 3034

James Buchanan, free frank "Free James Buchanan" on folded cover to Upton, Pa., "Washington City D.C., Free, Jan 4 1860" c.d.s., Very Fine.
Estimate $400 - 500

President James Buchanan tried to avoid acting at all on the in the crisis over the extension of slavery. His inaction is considered a major cause of the Civil War.

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Lot 3035

Stephen A. Douglas, free frank "free, S. A. Douglas, U.S.S. on cover to Washington D.C. bearing "Chicago Ill. Oct 7 1857" c.d.s.; no flap, top edge fault, Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300
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